Interview with Dan Hitchens about transsexuality and Catholicism

Last month I was blessed to be interviewed by an excellent journalist, Dan Hitchens, about the theological and pastoral landscape of transsexuality in the Catholic Church. I was interviewed alongside two other dear Catholic trans women: my friend Aoife Assumpta Hart, and a fellow activist Jane Fae.

An article based on the interview was featured in the Catholic Herald. You can read the entire article here: What’s the truth about transsexuality? by Dan Hitchens.

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Trans and Catholic: An Interview with Aoife Assumpta Hart (Reblog)

From an interview of Aoife Assumpta Hart by Melinda Selmys at Patheos.

Aoife2-300x281Just recently I’ve seen several well-meaning clergymen, with massive online platforms, proffering priestly pathologies on the origins of transsexuality. Unfortunately, in turning our lives into debatable symptoms, we who are spoken for can resemble rationality-bereft ghouls.

Our bodies have been compared to the Satanic iconography of Baphomet. Gender dysphoria has been contrasted with a five year old niece playing doggie. These comparisons are insulting, upsetting, and there merest chat with a trans person might enable our priests to offer evaluations that are more charitable.

Read more here.

“Call Me Caitlyn” – Commonweal (Link)

“Call Me Caitlyn” By J. Peter Nixon

The question as I see it is whether a person with a gender identity that is at variance with their chromosomal/physical gender necessarily violates the moral law if they choose to live according to their gender identity and (although this is a separate question) ultimately undergo gender reassignment surgery.

[…]

Perhaps the Church will come to recognize that a decision to pursue gender reassignment surgery need not be motivated by an understanding of gender that is incompatible with our theological anthropology.

Read the full article here.

 

 

The NY Times ‘Transgender Today’ on Nick Stevens

Another prominent article about Nick Stevens, a devout Catholic transgender man.

Transgender and Catholic. These two words often aren’t used in the same sentence (at least in a positive way), but these words best describe who I am.

Yes, I’m a Roman Catholic in an increasingly secular world. But I’m also a Catholic in a transgender community who has often experienced religion as a mask for bigotry or even violence.

So when I came out as a transgender male at my small Catholic college in St. Louis I feared my peers would not respond well. Whether it was reactions of hesitation or outright exclusion, I knew things would change.

And things did change. But for the better.

Read more at: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/storywall/transgender-today/stories/nick-stevens

“I’m Proud to be a Transgender Catholic” – TIME Magazine [Reblog]

“I’m Proud to be a Transgender Catholic” – TIME Magazine

I came to school as Jes, a compassionate, but at times confused, young female searching for a way through school. I left Fontbonne as Nick, a young Catholic man who was more confident going out into the world.

During my transition from female to male, I was often confused with and mad at God. I didn’t understand why I had been born in the wrong body. This anger and confusion with how God had made me seeped into my daily life. I often wasn’t present to my friends and their needs, and I lost a sense of who and what mattered to me.

During this struggle, I closed myself off to God. But God never tired of pursuing me, and eventually we rekindled our relationship. It was at this point that I relearned one of the basic truths of our faith: that God created me, that God loves me, and that God accompanies me. The Lord already knew that I wasn’t accepting a part of myself, but once I told God how broken I felt, he showed me how loved I was.

Read the rest here: http://time.com/3744270/catholic-church-pope-francis-transgender-community/